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Posted by on Jul 16, 2015 in Current Research | 11 comments

The Rudd/Redd Timeline

The Rudd/Redd Timeline

John and Avis Whitaker Rudd and children/William Redd

24 Oct. 1698 – In the Book “List of Emigrants from Liverpool 1697-1707”1, there is a list of emigrants on the ship St. John Baptest2 under Master Nicholas Franch (a Master was the same as the ship’s Captain3) all of whom were indentured servants. Children could be indentured as early as 7 years of age with most being 12 to 14 years of age.4 John Rudd was listed as a Webster (Weaver)5 for 4 years as an indentured servant. Since he was listed as a Webster or Weaver, he had already gone through an Apprenticeship. This was a legal document usually between a parent and a Master. Apprenticeships could be from 7 years or longer depending on the age of the child. The most common age was 12 to 14.6 Since he was listed with a trade, having gone through an apprenticeship in England, he was probably between the ages of 18 and 20. I believe that the 4 years of indenture by his name was probably a way of paying for his passage. After his 4 years were up, he would have been 21 to 23 years old.

24 Oct. 1701 – “John Rudd” was listed among 87 transported persons to America for which 4342 acres in Charles City County, VA, on both sides of Nottoway River were granted to Captain William Hunt.7 Several Rudd researchers think these 2 John Rudds were the same person. I think so too because of the reasons stated above. It is also convenient to note that his future wife Avis Whiteker came on this same day. On this same day in another transport, a John Rudds it says, “he was 4 times imported”. This time a William Jones Sr. got 600 acres in Charles City County on both sides of the Nottaway River. It looks like this was all the same person trying to get around the system by selling himself and getting money, especially if he wasn’t old enough yet to purchase land or get a land grant. He was again shown being transported on Oct. 20 1704 as a John Rud and a Mr. Charles Cozens received 362 acres in Henrico Co.8

24 Oct. 1701 – “Avis Whiteker” was listed among 20 transported persons to America for 1000 acres in Charles County, Virginia, on the south side of Worwick swamp and the north side of Joseph swamp was granted to Capt. Francis Epps, Mr. William Epps and Capt. Littlebury Epps.9

17 Aug. 1725 John Red and Avis Red were transported again. He had already been transported 4 times above in 1701. A grant was given to a John Pride for 328 acres N. side of the Appamattock River.10

27 May 1726 John Red, received 400 acres Henrico County, on N. side of Appamattock River adj. John Hatcher and Henry Walthall’s line.11

2 Aug. 1731 – John Rud and Avice, his wife, both of Henrico County, sold Rebeckah Frith, wife of John Frith of Henrico County, 200 acres on the north side of Middle Sappony Creek, near John Rud Jr., for 5 shillings. Witnesses were Jas. Powell Cocke and Richard Wood. The deed was recorded on 1st Monday 1731. 12 In the actual deed, it shows John and Avis Rudd to be John and Avis Redd for their marks at the end of the deed. The names Rudd and Redd are already starting to interchange in the same document this early on.13 This was their daughter.

1736 John Rudd, – 3 Levys (51 lbs of tobacco each), 310 acres, fees, to quitrents on 800 acres not on rent rolls, paid by cash to J. Gibson and by the Inspector at Warwick (Taxes etc. paid to John Nash, Sheriff, Henrico County.)14

1736 Jos. Rudd, – 1 levy, paid by Inspector at Warwick (Taxes, etc. paid to John Nash, Sheriff, Henrico, County)15

1736 John Rudd, Jr., – 1 levy, 200 acres, paid by cash to J. Gibson and by Inspector at Warwick (Taxes, etc., paid to Jon Nash, Sheriff, Henrico County)16

1736 Jno Rudd,-20 (Most likely lbs tobacco) (1736 a list of Mr. Secret’ys Fees for Jno Nash to collect. (Viz) (Taxes, etc., paid to John Nash, Sheriff, Henrico County)17

1736-1737 – “To Jno Rudd Senr alias Thos 170” (Lbs tobacco) “To Jno Rudd Junr alias Thos 51” (lbs tobacco) Messers Redford and Wilkinson, Inspectors at Warwick Debit. 1737/27/ (Taxes paid to John Nash, Sheriff, Henrico County)18 Alias means “also known as Thomas.” This meant he might have gone by this name at one point in time. The reason why is unknown.

1734 and before 1742Rachall Jordan married a Mr. Reade, he was given her inheritance at the time of her marriage in Norfolk County. 19 (This work was by Redd Researcher, Carolyn Nell A.G., in her Research report No.13 dated 20 Feb. 2008). (Norfolk County goes up to the James River and the Bay of Chesapeake, which connects Accomack County, a peninsula connected to Maryland for future reference.)

20 August 1741John Rudd – received a land grant of Henrico Parish, for 312 acres adjoining the land of Thomas Chetham, his own land, Ellison Clark and John Ferguson.20

Nov. 1742James Jordan of Norfolk County, wrote his will leaving thirty-five pounds to his sister, Rachall Reade, Martha Hodges, his mother was the executrix.21(Information furnished by Carolyn Nell AG for Redd family in Report No. 13, dated 20 Feb. 2008)

1743 – A William Red of Accomack County is on the tithable roll of Henry Scarburgh’s precinct in Accomack County. He tithed for two people.22 (This was documented by Carolyn Nell AG 24 Jan. 2008 in the Library of Virginia)

1738 approx.Whitaker Redd Sr. was most likely born in Accomack County. (as stated by Carolyn Nell in 2008) He is the son of William Redd. I think he was born approx. 1738 because if he owned land in Nansemond County by 1759, he would need to be 21 to legally own land.23 So I date his birth about this time, so his parents’ marriage probably took place closer to 1734 -1736, assuming he had an elder brother named William after his father.

30 March 1743John Rud Jr. obtains a land grant of 400 acres in Henrico County crossing Middle Saphony Cr. & several brs. Of the lower Sapony Cr: adj, John Wilkinson, John Rud Senr. & John Worsham. 24

30 June 1743James Rud granted 400 acres in Henrico County on East side of lower Saxony Cr, crossing the main Saxony Cr., adj John Worsham.25

16 June 1744Joseph Redd granted 400 acres Henrico County adj. Joseph & John Redd.26 In the Book” Cavaliers and Pioneers” Volume V 1741–1749, p. 121. It shows the name as Joseph Redd and adj. To said Joseph, and John Redd, Henry Waltham, Richard Wood, Owen and Benjamin Branch. The names Rud, Rudd, Red and Redd are interchanged in a lot of documents. Joseph Rudd was a son of John Rudd Sr.: They are the same person because of where the land is and who their neighbors are. In 1739 Benjamin Branch, a neighbor above was granted 623 acres of land adjacent John Rud which crossed several branches of the upper Saxony Creek.27

18 August 1744 – Will of John Rud of Henrico Parish. In 1749 it became a part of Chesterfield County, Virginia. The identified heirs are:

  • John Rud Jr.son
  • William Rudson (As per his father’s will (John Rud) it states several times, “If William never returns home,” then my grandson William Rud the son of Joseph is to receive William’s inheritance. This means William Rud was gone by 1744 and the family didn’t know where he was.)
  • Thomas Rudson named an Executor
  • Joseph Rud son named an Executor
  • James Rud son
  • Rebeccah daughter (got only one shilling – probably because she already got land fairly cheap in 1731)
  • Avis Wife (Everything goes to her until her death)

The will was witnessed by neighbors John Farguson and Moses Farguson on 8 Aug. 1744.

In the will, John Rudd Sr. only gives land to Thomas and William. He says every time he mentions William’s name, “If he never returns home, his grandson William son of Joseph” inherits. I believe, at this time, as far as the father knew everyone in the family already had land except Thomas and William. 28

26 May 1746William Redd buys land (approx. 100 acres) from John Taylor in Accomack County. (Per Carolyn Nell in Research report No. 13 on 20 Feb. 2008)29

28 August 1746John Rudd Jr. received another 400 acres on a grant in Amelia County this time.30

1747/48William Red’s land was processioned31 4 years in Accomack County. (This was a unique function assigned to parishes by the colonial General Assembly in 1705 and modified in 1748. He shared property boundary lines with William Meers and Rowland Savage. (Per Carolyn Nell’s report No 13 on 20 Feb 2008)32

December 1749 Death of John Rudd Sr. The inventory taken at this time is on google docs. It is from the same Deed Book as the original Will as stated above. In the inventory it states, there were a pair of cotton cards, a woolen wheel, a lennen wheel, 29 yards of checks (not sure what this is), 203/4 yards of ditto, 16 whole pieces of white linnen, 21 yard of checks, 6 yards of striped hollon? 1 old mire Five and 2 weavers shekels (Not sure what this is?) 15 pounds pickt cotton, 5 pounds of wool, etc. Does this tie in with the possibility that he is the Webster that came from England in 1698? Also the colonists’ looms were taxed because they wanted the colonists to buy cloth from England.33 Are some of the items names above like the 2 weavers shehels something only an experience weaver would have and did John teach his slaves to weave cloth? It appears like he made cotton, linen and wool cloth. All this, according to every article I have read would not have been common, even for a plantation. The colonies however did spin their own cloth in defiance of England, but maybe not to the extent he did. If being a weaver was an important skill, maybe that’s why he was able to pretend he was imported so much? (One record in Cavaliers and Pioneers, it says he was transported 8 times.)

17 December 1749 Ad placed in Maryland Gazette: To find William Rudd. This is how the family found him living in Accomack County. The ad says “he left VA 16 years ago designing as he said for Annapolis MD; If he be living and will apply to his brother Thomas RUD in Chesterfield Co. or to the printer of this paper, he may hear something to his advantage.” (MG 27 Dec.49)34

14 August 1750 William Rudd deeds to his brother Thomas for his share of the plantation in response to the ad. As I stated above, Accomack is just south of Maryland and just across the bay from Norfolk and close to Henrico County. This was a great find to put William Rudd in Accomack at the same time as our William Redd lived there. William sold , entire half of the estate to his brother Thomas for thirty pounds. One of the witnesses was Moses Farguson, a neighbor. William put an “R” as his mark when the deed was signed in Accomack. It isn’t an X, so maybe he knew how to write the last initial. The deed shows Wm, then the “R” and then the name “Rudd”. The Wm and the Rudd was written in the same handwriting. The “R” was not the same handwriting as the rest of the deed. The last paragraph says “At a Court in Chesterfield County Sept 7, 1750. This deed was proved by the oaths of the Witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded Test. B Watkins, Mark”35 Since the recording was only done by witnesses in Chesterfield County, it looks like William did not go home.

1753/54 death of John Rudd Jr. Will proved in court 1 February 1753 by Widow Ann or Hannah Russell Rudd.

1755 William Redd in Accomack County had land processioned. He shared property boundaries with Rowlin Savage, John Meers, and John Richardson. (As per Carolyn Nell’s report No 13 dated 20 Feb. 2008) Carolyn Nell AG goes on to tell in her report of William Redd’s activities in Accomack that lasted up till he sold property of 100 acres to Edmund Scarburgh of Accomack County in 1757. Apparently this is where his wife Rachel is first mentioned as his wife, which helps to solidify the other accounts regarding Rachall Jordan and her marriage etc.36

1759 William Red and Whitaker Red Sr. now show up in Nansemond County where his land is processioned, which appears to have been formerly owned by a Mr. Scarburgh. (Per Carolyn Nell AG in her report No. 13 dated 20 Feb. 2008) Whitaker would have to have been at least 21 to hold this land, which lends credence to possibly being born aprox.1738 in Accomack County. They might have moved after they sold their land in Accomack in1757 to Nansemond before their processioning in 1759 because they were marked present for the processioning.37

21 September 1759Avis Rudd does her will. An inventory is included in this book.38

Avis made Thomas, her son, the Executor. She apparently dies in 1760. Her will is presented in court 2 May 1760.

8 May 1760A court case with Thomas, Joseph, James, Will, Daniel Brown in right of his wife Elizabeth, Alexander Brown in right of his wife Mary, and John III (son of John Jr.) who was heir-at law of John Jr. were in court claiming “slaves of which John Rudd father of Thomas Rudd died Possessed.” The division of estate was made by Seth Ward and Archibald Cary39. This distribution was found in Chancery Court Records of Chesterfield County in 1771.

This began a long fight between family members that lasted until 1792 over slave ownership. What we learn from these cases is that John and Avis were Indentured servants as given by depositions made by: Aaron Ferguson on 10 Jan 1789, being sworn that he has often heard his parents say that John Rudd dec’d and Avis Rudd, Grandfather to the PLF were servants and after their servitude expired they intermarried…” Aaron Ferguson went on to say that Avis bore a child who eventually married a John Frith. This meaning Rebeccah, because she’s the only daughter and she eventually married a John Frith.

10 Dec 1789. Chesterfield County, VA. Charles Burton of lawful age being first sworn deposeth saith that he well knew John Rudd Dft,…a Servant, and also a woman whose name as well as he could recollect was Avis Whitaker a Servant to Peter Rowlett. He also says that Avis and John had two children, Rebekah and a son named John Jr. before they intermarried and that John Jr. was two when they married. Another deposition made by a William Williamson, age 77, states,” He lived many years a neighbor to John Rudd father and grandfather to the plaintiff etc. and that he has often heard the said John Rudd the elder and his wife say that John Rudd the father to the plaintiff was born within 7 months after their intermarriage and never heard him called a Bastard, but always understood he was born in wedlock.”

The family of John Jr. was suing Thomas Rudd, the son for the living descendants of the slaves for years. So as you can see there are various depositions that say which child was born out of wedlock, but most agreed they had been indentured. 40 Thomas Rudd, the son died circa 1792 and in a Chancery court file in 1794, the suit probably ended due to the fact that the key players were dead by this time, but there is no definitive proof. (All this needs to be copied and verified)(There are many copies online, but I haven’t seen the originals).

If I were to guess when John and Avis were married, it would have been after her indentured service was completed around 1706, if she had a servitude from 1701–1707, which could have been anywhere from 4 to 7 years. Indentured Servants were not allowed to marry. If a female indentured servant had a child out of wedlock, their sentence was lengthened by the law of the 1696 General Assembly of VA specified if a female servant had a child out of wedlock, her indentureship was to be lengthened along with the imposition of possible further fines or physical punishment. Avis’ sentence could have been extended by one and a half years or longer.41 This brought on constant speculation as to which child or children were born out of wedlock. The child or children could have been born anywhere from 1703 – 1706.42 One deposition in an ongoing court battle regarding slaves, said she only had one child out of wedlock and was 2 months pregnant when they were married, so the 2nd child was possibly born in wedlock. If I were her and had the prospect of a sentence extended yet again, I would imagine conception of another child would be much more deliberate. This is just a theory. If this were to be the case, then they could have been married around 1705-1708, depending on her original servitude. Then if we go in order of the will as a template for who was older, William would be the third child and possibly born around 1709 – 1710. We have no idea when our William Redd died, but it was probably in Nansemond County, since his land was processioned in 1759 and again in 1763.

25 October 1763William Redd and Whitaker Redd are processioned in Nansemond County as neighbors and so this probably means they are father and son. Another William Redd is processioned with a completely different piece of property with different neighbors Henry Gavin, John Ease and Daniel Gavin. Could this William have been a younger brother of Whitaker Sr. on page 170?43

1765 – circa approx. birth of Whitaker Redd Jr. in Nansemond County, VA.

1772 – I find a Wm. Reade next to a Mr. March and a Mansfield Turlington as neighbors, the same as the 1763 processioning. The spellings are sometimes interchangeable. Could this be the father? Perhaps he didn’t die after 1763.44

20 Dec. 1773Ruth Reade – I find a Ruth Reade caring for a Sarah Scarbord.45 (Could this be a wife of one of the sons? Either William Jr. or Whitaker Sr. We have never known Whitaker Sr. wife’s name. The name Scarbord could be short for Scarburgh, with which the Redd’s had a lot of dealings with.) I can’t find the Redd name or Reade name in this Vestry Book after 1772. Could some of the Redd have gone to N.C. sooner than we think?

1781William Red of Nansemond County signs a petition wanting leniency for slaves. (Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 16:83 and 207-208. This information provided by Carolyn Nell AG in Research No. 13 report in 2008)

May 1781William Redd enlisted for a year until May 25, 1782. He enlists in North Carolina, under a Capt. Doughtery. The family must have moved in the early part of 1781 since he is enlisted by May of 1781.46

1783Whitaker Redd Jr. enlisted in the Wilmington District Militia, 76th Regiment from 16 July 1783 to 19 March 1784. He would have been about 18 when he enlisted.47 This information also shows his first wife being Nancy Cary, then Elizabeth Hardison and then Lurana Wilkins.

1789 approx.Whitaker Redd Sr. dies in Onslow County, North Carolina, so they probably moved after 1781 but before 1783, when Whitaker Jr. enlists in the Revolution in Onslow County, N.C. His elder brother William Redd Jr. also serves in N.C. during the Revolutionary War also. Elder brother William is the Administrator for his father’s estate on 13 April 1789. These are in the archives in Raleigh, N.C. per Lura Redd in her book “The Utah Redds and their Progenitors” page XII. 1973.

10 August 1822William Redd Jr. does his will and names his children and wife.48

2 March 1825 Whitaker Redd Jr. Death in Onslow County, N.C. (Family Data Collection Deaths)49

1833Brother William Redd asks for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary war.50

 


 

1 List of Emigrants from Liverpool 1697-1707; page 14: Publisher Boston, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1913. Call number: 9650379; Book Contributor – Library of Congress. Digitalization- done by the Sloan Foundation. https://archive.org/stream/listofemigrantst00bost#page/n3/mode/2up

2 Misspelled words in this document are shown as they were sourced.

3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_captain

4 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indentured_servant

5 www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~alhenry2/old-occupations.htm

6 https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Apprenticeship_in_England

7 Virginia land patents Book 9, Pages 390-2: Library of VA website, Richmond, VA. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/009/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Abstracts by Nell Marion Nugent, Volume III 195-1732 p 51: ISBN # 08849008535.4th Impression 2004. Call number: 975.5R2n v1-8, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

8 Virginia land patents 1697-1706 Book 9 page 629: Library of Virginia website, Richmond, VA. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/009. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” by Nell Marion Nugent, Volume III 1695-732 p.89: ISBN #08849008535.4th Impression 2004. Call number: 975.5 R2n v1-8, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

9 Virginia land patents 1697-1706, pp 380-381: Library of Virginia website, Richmond, VA. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/009/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” by Nell Marion Nugent, Volume III 1695-1732 p 49-50: ISBN #08849008535. 4th Impression 2004.Call Number: 975.5R2n v1-8, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

10 Virginia land patents No.12 1724-1726 page 315: Library of Virginia website, Richmond, VA. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/011-1/.

11 Book, “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Abstracts by Nell Marion Nugent Volume III 1695-1732, p. 298: ISBN # 08849008535, 4th Impression 2004. Call number: 975.5 R2n v108, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah. (Can’t find in VA Library online)

12 Book, “Henrico County Virginia Deeds”, 1706-2737, Benjamin B. Weisiger III, Iberian Publishing, Athens, Georgia, 1985, page 117: Call number; 975.5453 R2w, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

13 County Court records deeds, wills, Settlement of estates etc. (Henrico) Courts, Virginia 1714-1737 No. 1 Part 2 (Book 2): Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah at the Virginia State on Library 27 March 1947. Microfilm number: 31765, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

14 “John Nash’s Account Book, Abstracts” in Beverly Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume 21, Henrico County-Southside, 1737, Southern Historical Press, Inc. Easley, SC. 1985. P.27. Microfilm number: 850105 Item 5, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

15 “John Nash’s Account Book, Abstracts” in Beverly Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume 21, Henrico County-Southside, 1737, Southern Historical Press, Inc. Easley, SC. 1985, p.27. Microfilm number: 850105 Item 5, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

16 John Nash’s Account Book, Abstracts” in Beverly Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume 21, Henrico County-Southside, 1737, Southern Historical Press, Inc. Easley, SC. 1985, p.27. Microfilm number: 850105 Item 5, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

17 John Nash’s Account Book, Abstracts” in Beverly Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume 21, Henrico County-Southside, 1737, Southern Historical Press, Inc. Easley, SC. 1985, p.46. Microfilm number: 850105 Item 5, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

18 John Nash’s Account Book, Abstracts” in Beverly Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume 21, Henrico County-Southside, 1737, Southern Historical Press, Inc. Easley, SC. 1985, p.52. Microfilm number: 850105 Item 5, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

19 Norfolk County, Virginia Marriage Bonds 1706-1767 and 1769-1779: Virginia State Library and Archives, Richmond Virginia, Microfilm Reel # 74a.

20 Virginia Land Patents, No. 18, 1739-1741, page 1106: Library of VA website. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/017/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Volume IV 1732-1741, p. 252: Edited by Dennis Ray Hudgins: Published by the Virginia Genealogical Society 1994, Richmond, Virginia.

21 Norfolk County, Virginia Wills & Deeds, Book H. 1742-1749, Virginia State Library and Archives, Richmond, Virginia, Reel #47. ( a copy from Carolyn Nell on Google Docs) Also in a Book of Brief Abstracts of Norfolk County Wills 1710-1753, p. 170. Author: Charles Fleming McIntosh: Published by: 975.5523 P2m, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

22 Originals, 1742 Tithables List by Henry Scarburgh, Manuscript Records, Box 1, Barcode 1156715, Location 4/F/70/11/2; Virginia State Library & Archives, Richmond VA.(Copy on Google Docs from Carolyn Nell AG.)

23 www.genfiles.com/articles/legal-age/

24 Virginia Land patents No. 20, 1741-1743 (Vol. 1 & 2) p. 495: Library of VA website. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/018/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants Volume V, 1741-1749, p. 33: Published by the Virginia Genealogical Society, 1994, Richmond, Virginia.

25 Virginia Land patents No. 21, 1741-1743 pp 422/423: Library of VA website. Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/019/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Volume V 1741-1749 p.58: Edited by Dennis Ray Hudgins: Published by the Virginia Genealogical Society, 1994, Richmond, Virginia.

26 Virginia Land patents No. 23 1743-1745 page 702: Library of VA website: Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/021/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Abstracts of Land Patents and Grants Volume V 1741-1749, p. 121: Edited by Dennis Ray Hudgins and published by the Genealogical Society of Virginia in 1994. Richmond, VA.

27 Virginia Land patents No. 18, 1738-1739, p. 397: Library of VA website Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/016/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Abstracts of Land Patents and Grants Volume IV 1723-1741, p.199: Edited by Dennis Ry Hudgins and published by the Genealogical Society of Virginia in 1994. Richmond, VA.

28 Chesterfield County Virginia Will Book No. 1 with Inventories & Accounts 1749-1765 pages 47-49. Inventory was pages 50 and 51: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah: 1948, 1975 at the Virginia State Library. Original documents from Chesterfield County Courthouse: Microfilm number 30872, pages 47-51: FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah. (I made a copy while in Virginia at the Library of Virginia and it is transcribed and on our Family site at google docs).

29 Accomack County, Virginia Land Deeds, No. 1 1744-1746 Folio 385-531 and Accomack County, Virginia Land Deeds 1746-1749 Folio 1-254: Abstracted by Leslie and Neil Keddie: Folio 502, p. 25: Call number: 975.516 R2: FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

30 Virginia Land patents No.24 1746-1746 pp 363-364: Library of VA website: Source address: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/LO-1/022/. Also in the Book “Cavaliers and Pioneers” Abstracts of Virginia Land patents and Grants Volume V:1741-1749: Edited by Dennis Ray Hudgins: Published by the Virginia Genealogical Society 1994: Richmond, VA.

31 www.genfiles.com/articles/processioning/

32 Accomack County Vestry Orders 1723-1784 Microfilm# 30107 Item 4 p.113 &136: FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah. A Book called “Accomack County Processioners Returns 1723-1792 for Accomack & St. George Parishes: Transcribed by Gail M. Walczyk. Published by Peters Row, Coran NY: Call number 975.516R2w: FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

33 http://www.ehow.com/about_4567446_colonial-weaving.html : By Lynn Bland.

34 Genealogical Abstracts from 18th Century Newspapers by Roberts K Headley Jr. Published by the Genealogical Publishing Company in Baltimore, MD in 1987. FHL call number is: US/CAN 976.5 D2hr and entry is on page 294 listed as William Rud.

35 Chesterfield County Virginia Deed Book No. 1, part 1:1749-1753 pgs. 155,156 in Deed Book V 1-3 1749-1759: Microfilm number 30887: Chesterfield County, VA court filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah 1948.

36 Virginia Court (Accomack) Deed Records 1663-1799: Grantor Index to Deeds – 1663-1799; microfilm # 1902256 Item2: Published by Genealogy Society of Utah(1946?) 1949,1980,Richmond, VA, Richmond State Library

37 The Vestry Book of the Upper Parish of Nansemond County, VA: 1743-1793 Pages 143 – Wilmer L Hall Editor: Published by the Commonwealth of VA: 1948: Call number 975.553 K2h. FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah.

38 Chesterfield County Virginia Will Book 1, 1749-1774; pages, 312,472: County Court of Chesterfield County, VA: Filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah 1948,1975 at Richmond State Library, Richmond, VA,USA. Microfilm # 3087

39 Elizabeth Hancock was through the Ward line. Elizabeth’s father, Zebedee Hancock’s mother was Sarah Ward. The Cary line was through Whitaker Redd Jr.’s first wife, Nancy Cary. Families tend to have the same migration patterns.

40 Chesterfield County, Virginia Chancery “Dead” Papers, Box 38, 1794-No. 1 John Rudd ,PLT vs. Thos Rudd, DFT. (Cecilie Gaziano, Re: John Rudd Sr. of Chesterfield Co., VA, 1700’s, may have been from Liverpool: genforum.genealogy.com/rudd/messages/1388.html).

41 http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/_An_act_for_punishment_of_ffornication_and_seaverall_other_sins_and_offences_1696. ( This has the actual law that was written about this)

42 http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Indentured_Servants_in_Colonial_Virginia

43 The Vestry Book of the Upper Parrish of Nansemond County,VA:1743-1793 Pages 170-171.Wilmer L Hall Editor: Published by the Commonwealth of Virginia: 1948: Call number 975.553 K2h, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

44 The Vestry Book of the Upper Parrish of Nansemond County, VA: 1743 -1793 Page 216. Wilmer L Hall Editor: Published by the Commonwealth of Virginia: 1948: Call number 975.553 K2h, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

45 The Vestry Book of the Upper Parrish of Nansemond County, VA: 1743 -1793 Pages 223 and 226. Wilmer L Hall Editor: Published by the Commonwealth of Virginia: 1948: Call number 975.553 K2h, FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

46 William served May 1781 to May 1782 under Capt. Doughtery in NC. www.fold3.com (Paid site) The National Archive: M804, Revolutionary War pension and Bounty-Land Application Files. NARA. National catalog ID: 300022, NARA M804: Revolutionary War Pension-Land Warrant Application Files. N.C. Pension Number S.7373

47 28 Service Record “Revolutionary Army Accounts” NC # lX, P 19 Folio 3 Roll #S. 115.57.4. Paid for Services, Wilmington District, DAR records online, DAR, Washington DC, USA (Membership required. These personal records have been conferred by the Daughters of The American Revolution with Whitaker Redd Jr. as my patriot. It refers to his service record.)

48 North Carolina wills and abstract of wills 1740-1860 By Daughter of The American Revolution, Alexander (Martin Chapter) FHL microfilm # 860339 Item 2: Onslow County N.C. Will Book B (1827-1838) page 1393.

49 Source: Edmund West, Comp., Family Data Collection – deaths, (database online) Provo, Utah, USA: Ancestry.com. Operations Inc., 2001. (Paid site)

50 www.fold3.com. (Paid site) (NARA microfilm publication M804, 3670 rolls) Archive Roll 2012, 20 pages in packet. Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Record group 15. National Archives, Washington D.C.

11 Comments

  1. Very interesting and easy to follow. Thanks for this.

    What it doesn’t address is Captain John Rudd who came to Jamestown as a weaver aged 19 in 1663 and later became master of the Hopewell. There are two captains John Rudd in the William Byrd letters edited books.

    I am still hoping that someone will get the port logs from London and Jamestown and compare them for fibbing or other anomalies.

    Truly grateful and thankful that you can make sense of it all.

  2. This John Rudd I talk about was a Webster and an indentured servant in 1698 in the Book “Emigrants from Liverpool 1697-1707”.

    If he was a captain, he would have not been indentured and a weaver at the same time.

    If we had DNA from people in England who claim to be from the Captain would help. But I don’t know who they are.

    Emily

  3. Then from Virginia’s Eastern Shore by Ralph Whitelaw, Vol. 2, Cloucester, Mass. Peter Smith 1968: 1734 Nathaniel (Willis), then living in Somerset, sold to John Taylor who gave to his son John eight years later. 1746 He sold to William Red, and eleven years later William and Rachel Redd sold to Edmund Scarburgh. 1764 Scarburgh’s executor sold to John Robins Downing and in 1779 he (wife Sophia) left to his son John Downing. This from the section Accomack County A49, p 793
    This is an entry you probably already have, but I found this in a library in Accomack last summer.
    John

  4. I just gave the source for William’s purchase of the 100 acres as the abstract. These were originally found by Carolyn Nell, AG, who was the original Redd Genealogist. But thanks for the other sources.Then I used the microfilm source of the sale of William and Rachel Redd’s land in 1757. That is good you are looking also. It is great people do their own research.

    Emily

  5. John Rudd, the father of John Rudd who married Avis was also a weaver who came at age 19 and was a Sea Captain and are father and son in the books of the Captains Byrds of VA.

    i have talked to tom holiday who lives in Arlington or thereabouts into going to the library in VA and looking in the Port Logs. Then I have tried to talk Deann and Paul Carter to take a vacation to London and check out those Port Logs.

    If Captain John Rudd Jr (Avis) was merely a weaver, and of course tobacco plantation owner since tobacco was cash, why was he transported do many times? Reading the Byrd books you would see how he and others like Epps had cornered much of the shipping money or maybe the 2nd John Rudd of the Hopewell just wasn’t old enough to hold his own as captain.

    Interesting fact just learned is that the ships going across the ocean were of different sizes ans they crossed the ocean in flotillas for safety from pirates. Going south on the Bermuda runs which the Captains Whittaker Redd most likely did as well as up the coast to New England. The Byrd books show him sending goods to Bermuda and getting back sugar and rum — trade all up and down the coast and Carribean.

    Those not in vestry books in 1700’s may have become Sebaptists or John Smyth Separatist Baptists. The Anglicans were not made a state religion because of the usual culprit. the pride on both sides of the ocean. the Virginians because the Anglicans in power in England wouldn’t give them an ordained priest of their own colonists but sent Anglican Bishop. Found outwith my Willis captains which the Willises can’t agree on who is who or fathered whom.

    Irish sugar slaves of west indies and mated mated to Africans for strength and money furnished slaves after the Africans slave running was outlawed. That also added to the trade of the sea merchants who traveled up and down coasts.

    my Adair ancestors were Indian traders and coopers by trade. Cloth from weavers on plantation was probably traded for Indian items/crafts/furs, which went to England?

    In the meantime my new England ancestors were making slaves out of conquered Indians. That and their murderous treatment 9same as their English contemporaries).

  6. I have been researching the Rudd/Redd line, trying to find a way that my ancestor George Reed might fit in. George Reed’s pension application says that he was born in King William Co, VA in 1760 but his family moved to North Carolina when he was young. He was living in Onslow County, NC at the beginning of the Revolutionary War. He was injured during the war and was taken to his father’s house, which he said was ‘about 40 miles from Wilmington’. In all of my searching, I have not found Reeds in Onslow County during that time period. I believe the Redds would have owned land that would be about 40 miles from Wilmington. George’s father died after the war and George and his mother moved to Charlotte County, VA. I know that Whitaker, Sr. died in 1789, which would have been near the end of the war. Does anyone have information that might tie George Reed to the Redds?

  7. IMO those gaming the system to get land for transportings or head rights from paying way of others may well have lied about being married in order to get transport for Mrs Avis Rudd. I don’t think married women or men were transported to be indentured servants.

    “Indentured Servants were not allowed to marry. If a female indentured servant had a child out of wedlock, their sentence was lengthened by the law of the 1696 General Assembly of VA specified if a female servant had a child out of wedlock, her indentureship was to be lengthened along with the imposition of possible further fines or physical punishment. ”

    Getting hung up on the indentured servant words and the picture modern minds might interpret is not leading to clarity or helping get past the brick wall of Avis and John Thomas Rudd, son and daughter in law of John Rudd transported in 1663, also a weaver and a captain who played the transporting for land game well with his elite cousins and acquaintances such as his cousin William Byrd.

    When William Byrd started shipping his own tobacco , legal tender in VA since they had no coinage, the country builders or ruling class, plantation owners, sons of royalty and merchants (the gold smith’s of London such as Thomas Grendon who hired the 1663 transport Captain Rudd and who married William Byrd’s mother making them “cousins”?) Aee 1685 letter to Capt John Rudd.

    The colonists had to make money for their English overlords or sponsors in the Virginia Company and later monarchs. With tobacco one needed slaves and one letter was looking for good yeomen or farmers so many unproductive elite gents on first boats over. Weaving linen was a cottage industry which was wanted along with coopers or barrel makers. The trade in native American goods was big money maker for the William Byrds and other grandees of the plantations.

    William Byrd II or III was responsible for bringing over the fighting Celts or Scots Irish who by blood would have been Rudd related back to Sottish Highlands and border wars, etc, but were the poor folks of northern Ireland who were given land in Appalachia by Byrd as a buffer between the gentry of the plantations and the disgruntled native Americans.

    William Redd was more fond of his Whittaker uncles in Accomack than his Rudd heritage which he sold and bought land and ran with his mothers people who were most likely more socially prominent. A child or first son wasn’t named for father but for grandfather and for mother’s father if he more socially prominent. Whittaker Redd could have been first son??

    The reason that the Redds disappeared from history may well have been because they were loyalists or royalists during the revolution.

    The first Captain Rudd who I am sure is John who married Avis’s father used the alias Thomas for some of his land getting transports and also used James as aliases. The Thomas for Thomas Grendon his benefactor?

    If using the William Byrd diaries for clues to customs and/or relationships it might be noted that John Rudd who married Avis could not have been born in 1678 and also been Captain when he was given letter for his father the Capt Ruddes as Marion Tingling has him being???

  8. Also on giving so much weight to the depositions or hearsay evidence of the suing parties, it might be noted that they are dated 100 years after any event they are supposed to know about. The Rudds/Redds long gone from Henrico or Chesterfield by then?

    Capt John Rudd transported in 1663 for economic adventure and because of political change in England–the death of Cromwell. Movie promotion words ” Oliver Cromwell can no longer tolerate King Charles’ policies and the self-interest of the ruling class and leads a civil war to install Parliament as the ultimate ruler of England. ”

    IMO the Rudds timeline might be well to include the political changes of when James was in power or Charles etc?

    http://www.history.com/topics/british-history/oliver-cromwell

  9. Regarding “8 May 1760 – A court case with Thomas, Joseph, James, Will, Daniel Brown in right of his wife Elizabeth, Alexander Brown in right of his wife Mary, and John III (son of John Jr.) who was heir-at law of John Jr. were in court claiming “slaves of which John Rudd father of Thomas Rudd died Possessed.” “, you later state that John Rudd only had one daughter, presumably based on your summary of the will, but it is believed that Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Brown, and Mary, wife of Alexander Brown, were also daughters of John Rudd. Otherwise, why would they be involved in the division of John Rudd’s estate?

    FWIW, the parents of Daniel Brown and Alexander Brown were also indentured servants.

  10. Why do you think that Avis and John Rudd/Redd/Reade kept getting transported? It was adding themselves to the count for fee granted for sponsoring or transporting someone and to get the acreage for same. William Byrd states in one letter for someone to be sure to count themselves. IOW the Captain himself counted himself.

    Traveling back and forth to England and in the ship master’s cabin may have taken only 6 weeks by then and the Virginians went back and forth with the change in who had political power in England and hence may have searched to kill old rivals? Jabez Whittaker disappeared from Jamestown in 1625-6 when Charles I came into power and from Barbados in 1649

    First tobacco and first slaves into Virginia. Comment on the sugar slaves turnover. time line 1601-1620 with links to more English Timeline http://www.fsmitha.com/time/ce17-2.htm

  11. This is so interesting. I’ve been working on this line on my tree for a few years and have always wondered if John Sr was the son of Capt. John Rudd. It seems not.
    Back to the drawing board.

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